Keeping the Season of Lent

ON THE ORIGIN OF LENT
In the early Church, catechumens, most of whom in those days were converts who had been reared as pagans, were given extensive instruction and preparation. This culminated in a forty-day period of prayer, fasting, and instruction just before they were due to be baptized on Holy Saturday and receive the Holy Communion for the first time when they joined as full participants with the rest of the Christian community.

Later, the practice was extended to those who had committed notorious sins and those living lives that amounted to denying the faith. Upon repentance, they were readmitted to Christian fellowship. Still, later, the Church came to regard the 40 days of preparation for Easter as appropriate for all Christians. Appropriate first of all because we have all sinned in the last year, even though our sins may not have been so serious as to force their attention on the community. Secondly, because all Christians are united by the Spirit into one Body in Christ, so that the victory of Satan over one is a wound felt by all.

Thus every year the whole Church prepares for Easter by repentance, by a special program of prayer and instruction, by seeking for spiritual renewal and growth, so that we may celebrate with joy the feast of the Resurrection of our Lord.

MORE ABOUT LENT
Lent is a 40-day liturgical season that begins on Ash Wednesday and concludes on Maundy Thursday. Sundays are not included in the 40-day count because every Sunday is a joyful celebration of Jesus’ resurrection. Though not biblical, Lent has long been a tradition in the Christian Church, and it is thought that the tradition of the 40 days recalls the 40 days Jesus spent in the wilderness, fasting and being tempted by Satan [Matthew 4:1-11].
Lent is considered a time of penance and discipline.
Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. On this day, Christians focus on their complete sinfulness and the necessity of Christ’s suffering and death to insure their salvation. Ashes are referred to many times in the Old Testament as signs of sorrow, mourning, humility, and repentance, and on Ash Wednesday they are used to remind people of their mortality — that “you are dust, and to dust you shall return” [Genesis 3:19].
The Sunday of the Passion or Palm Sunday begins the last week of Lent, known as Holy Week. During this holiest time of the church year, the worship services relive the final week of our Lord’s human life. Holy Week includes Maundy Thursday, when Christians observe Christ’s “Last Supper” – the institution of the Sacrament of Holy Communion – and the mandate to serve one another in love. Good Friday commemorates the imprisonment, trial and death by crucifixion of Jesus. Lent culminates on Saturday evening of Holy Week in the Great Vigil of Easter, when Christians gather in darkness, light new fire, celebrate the light of salvation and that has come and the fulfillment of the Old Testament prophecies in the resurrection of Christ.
The Episcopal Church of St. Clement & St. Peter

OBSERVANCE OF A HOLY LENT

Ash Wednesday
February 18, 2015
7:00 PM Holy Eucharist With Imposition of Ashes

Sundays of Lent
February 22, 2015 9 AM Holy Eucharist

March 1, 2015 9 AM Holy Eucharist
March 8, 2015 9 AM Holy Eucharist

March 15, 2015 9 AM Holy Eucharist
[NOTE: Easter Flower Orders Due This Week]

March 22, 2015 9 AM Holy Eucharist

Palm Sunday
March 29, 2015 9 AM Holy Eucharist With Blessing of Palm

OTHER
Wednesdays: Days of Prayer
7 AM – 7 PM Trinity Episcopal Church of West Pittston Open for Quiet Prayer
Stations of The Cross
Friday, February 20, 2015
5:30 PM Soup and Bread Meal followed by 6:15 PM Stations of The Cross at The Episcopal Church of St. Clement and St. Peter, Hanover Street, Wilkes-Barre

Friday, February 27, 2015
6:15 PM Stations of The Cross at The Episcopal Church of St. Clement and St. Peter, Hanover Street, Wilkes-Barre

Friday, March 6, 2015
6:15 PM Stations of The Cross at The Episcopal Church of St. Clement and St. Peter, Hanover Street, Wilkes-Barre

Friday, March 13, 2015
6:15 PM Stations of The Cross at The Episcopal Church of St. Clement and St. Peter, Hanover Street, Wilkes-Barre

Friday, March 20, 2015
6:15 PM Stations of The Cross at The Episcopal Church of St. Clement and St. Peter, Hanover Street, Wilkes-Barre

Friday, March 27, 2015 ***
5:30 PM Soup and Bread Meal followed by 6:15 PM Stations of The Cross [ ***NOTE: at Trinity Episcopal Church of West Pittston]

Thursday, March 19, 2015
11 AM CHRISM MASS / Blessing of The Oils
[Nativity Cathedral, Bethlehem]

Maundy Thursday
April 2, 2015
5:30 PM AGAPE DINNER [NOTE: at St. Clement and St. Peter, Hanover Street, Wilkes Barre ] followed by 7:00 PM Holy Eucharist with The Washing of Feet

Good Friday ***
April 3, 2015
5:30 PM Good Friday Services [ *** NOTE: at Trinity Episcopal Church West Pittston]

Easter Vigil ***
April 4, 2007
7:30 PM The Holy Vigil and Lighting of The New Fire [ *** NOTE: at St. Stephen’s Pro-Cathedral, Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre]

 

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